PANELS

Panel 1a

Social work, health sciences and practical theology in the context of migration and integration


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Norbert Frieters-Reermann

CONTENT:

The panel is based on the triangle of personal, structural and cultural violence by Johan Galtung, which enables a suitable framework for social work, health sciences and practical theology in the context of migration and integration.
Galtung divides three forms of violence: Personal violence is direct and can be physical or psychological verbal or non-verbal. But it is visible as human behaviour which targets and hurts other human beings. Structural violence is indirect. It includes all forms of discrimination and exclusion, which are institutionalised in social systems. Structural violence is usually invisible, embedded in social structures and normalised by institutions, rules and organisations. Cultural violence is based on collective narratives, believes, values and norms of societies. These are produced by public discourses, religion, art, literature, language and symbolic actions. Cultural violence refers to aspects of culture that can be used to justify violence and exclusion. Hence, cultural violence contributes to the normalisation of all forms of direct or structural violence.
The triangle of violence can be used in panel in two ways:
1) to analyse and describe different forms of violence, discrimination and exclusion related to migration.
2) to identify entry points for social work, health sciences and practical theology.

TALKS :

Prof. em., Thomas Hülshoff, MD (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
Crises of enculturation and identity, traumatisation and PTSD of people facing migration, flight or expulsion

Assoc. Prof. Maureen Porter, PhD (USA), University of Pittsburgh
Cultural strengths as compensatory frames and entry points in addressing violence

Stephanie Langley & Liz Ellis (UK), University of Winchester
Asylum and Sanctuary in a Divided Nation – supporting young asylum seekers in higher education

Anke Reermann (Germany), Diocese Aachen
Empowering refugees with Capacitar

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Panel 1b

Utopia becomes real – examples of practical implementation of human rights in social work and health sciences


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Tanja Hoff

CONTENT:

Human rights interpreted as fundamental human needs are the basic guiding principles for social work, health sciences and practical theology, although their universal claims in different cultural contexts may vary. Social work, health sciences and practical theology must be based on a cross-cultural concept of human dignity, beyond unilateral political and cultural concerns, to ensure a sound and professionally coherent approach. Five talks in this panel will give a practical insight in dealing with vulnerable groups in social work and the health sector. We will discuss how human rights are put into practice and how social work, health sciences and practical theology can meet global human rights challenges in local contexts in a professional and innovative way.

TALKS :

Carlos Man Ging (Ecuador), Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador Ibarra
What we learned about training tutors in the prevention of sexual abuse of children and youngsters?

Roshan Heiler (Germany), Solidarity with Women in Distress (SOLWODI)
Reaching out to victims of sexual exploitation: The work of Solwodi Aachen

Yoko Kato (Japan), TEIKYO University of Science
Quality life of survey for women in high medical dependence rolls

Katharina Montens (Germany), German Society for International Cooperation (GIZ)
Mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) for refugees in developement cooperation

Jeffrey Shook (USA), University of Pittsburgh
A Living Wage as a Human Right in a U.S. and Comparative Context­

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Panel 1c

The welfare state in the European process of integration and globalisation – social work in new regulatory structures


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Monika Többe-Schukalla

CONTENT:

Even though the powers and competences of the EU have increased in many political fields, it is difficult to conceive an independent European social model. Social policy, which is a crucial factor in social work, is governed by the individual member states, whose autonomy is limited by processes of liberal openness and transformation. These processes have strong impacts on the ways welfare states and respectively social work are organized and regulated. Within the panel we will analyse and discuss these developments from various points of views.
The Swedish universal welfare model has changed profoundly as power, resources and influence have been reallocated away from the democratically governed public sector towards the market driven private sector. Swedish welfare has been replaced by a mixed welfare model with increasing market liberal elements. Some of the consequences are less equal distributions of education, healthcare and elderly care services, lower democratic influence and reduced possibilities for redistribution policies.
Especially families and children are one of the most vulnerable groups who are concerned by multiple problems and conflicts resulting from socially disadvantaged living situations in different European member countries. The task of this joint project between four partner universities was to identify the degree and limit of official welfare state regulations and the way they include or exclude families and children.
The problem of aging population is global. As regards Africa, by 2050 the number of 60+ persons living there is expected to grow from 50 million to almost 200 million. Still, some African countries are ill-prepared for such growth of senior citizens, especially because of lack of pension systems and support network. Social systems and models of social protection intended to help the African seniors will be discussed.

TALKS :

Prof. Stefan Sjöberg, PhD (Schweden), University of Gävle
Social work in the context of the Swedish welfare model in transition from universal to mixed welfare

Prof. Sven Trygged, PhD (Schweden), University of Gävle
& Harri Mäkinen (Finland), South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences
& Dr. Magdalena Wędzińska & Dr. Monika Lewicka (Poland), Kazimierz Wielki University in Bydgoszcz
& Prof. Dr. Monika Többe-Schukalla (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
Family policies in EU member states – a comparative analysis of welfare for families living under poverty conditions and social exclusion between Sweden, Finland, Poland and Germany

PhDr. Monika Nova, PhD (Czech Republic), Charles University in Prague
Globalisation and its impacts in Africa's developing countries – impacts of demographic aging population

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Panel 1d

Inclusive social sustainability in the 2030 agenda – promoting participation of vulnerable groups


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Sabine Schäper

CONTENT:

Agenda 2030 is referred to as a paradigm shift in international development cooperation as it places shared responsibility on the implementation of the economic, environmental and social dimensions of sustainability for developing, emerging and industrialised countries. The encyclical “Laudato Si” argues the same position. However, social sustainability is not broadly discussed. The panel presents some examples from research projects and best practice, focusing on persons with disabilities as one of the most vulnerable groups even in international development. We will discuss consequences and perspectives for professional practice with respect to social work, health sciences and practical theology.

TALKS :

Prof. Dr. Sabine Schäper (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
International perspectives on disability: Leaving no-one behind!

Lars Wissenbach (Germany), University of Siegen
Making cities and human settlements inclusive (SDG goal 11): The innovative potential of the 2030 Agenda for inclusive local development – theoretical assumptions and practical experiences from Ghana

Yoko Okamoto (Japan), Hiroshima Bunka Gakuen University
Promoting inclusive societies (SDG goal 16): A study on support for autistic children with highly artistic skills and their parents through art exhibitions

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Panel 1e

Human dignity, justice, peace – the tasks facing religions


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Joachim Söder

CONTENT:

Religions are often accused of acting as catalysts for radicalisation in an increasingly interconnected world: from Northern Ireland to the Middle East to Myanmar, violent explosions are interpreted as conflicts based on religious confrontation. But religion also has the potential to create meaning, without which such conflicts of diversity cannot be resolved, or can only superficially be resolved. The defence of human dignity against exploitation, oppression and maltreatment, the effort to create fair conditions and the peaceful power of reconciliation are core competencies of religions and indispensable resources to achieve carefully considered local and global social work, health sciences and practical theology.

TALKS :

Olha Boyko, PhD (Ukraine), Ukrainian Catholic University
Education of the prosociality as a joint task for social work and practical theology towards social justice and peace guarantee in Ukraine

Assoc. Prof. Svetlana Trbojevik (Republic of North Macedonia), Ss. Cyril and Methodious
Fundamental values in Christianity reflected in social welfare and social work

Prof. Hidemi Sasaki, RN, MA, PhD (Japan), Hiroshima Bunka Gakuen University
Contribution to Community Welfare Requires Collaboration of Nursing, Welfare, and Educationwork

 

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Panel 2a

Professionalisation and academisation of social work in the process of transformation


CHAIR:

Regine Müller (Research associate)

CONTENT:

The inclusion of social work in academic educational systems is an important part of professionalisation in every country, and each country may approach this issue in very different ways. Transformational processes in society and changes in social or health care systems can be both a challenge and an asset to the professionalisation and academisation of social work. This panel starts with laying out a broader perspective on social work in strengthening a European pathway and focussing on the global definition of social work. The panel asks how different countries approach current challenges of professionalisation in specific ways. It concludes with the question of how can the increasing international networking of social work at an academic level learn from each other in the challenge of professionalising within transformational societal processes.

TALKS:

Regine Müller (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
Negotiating social problems – Professionalism in combatting child poverty in Germany

Prof. Skaidrite Gutmane (Latvia), Latvian Christian Academy
Caritative social work as innovation from antiquity

Mgr. Silvie Treterová & doc. RNDr. Jaroslava Pavelková (Czech Republic), Tomas Bata University in Zlín
Education within the degree study of health and social care worker at Tomas Bata University in Zlín (Health and Social Care Study Program)

PhDr. Katerina Samalova, PhD (Czech Republic), Charles University in Prague
Professional identity of social work in the hands of educators

Yuliia Kokoiachuk, PhD (Ukraine), Ukrainian Catholic University
Transformational processes in Ukrainian society as the key factor for professionalisation and academisation of social work

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Panel 2b

Social innovation


CHAIR:

Dr. Dirk Johann

CONTENT:

Social innovations are defined as „activities and services that are motivated by the goal of meeting a social need and that are predominantly diffused through organisations whose primary purposes are social“ (Mulgan, 2006). They are not developed by lone individuals, but shaped by the interplay of a wider array of actors and institutions. What distinguishes social innovators is their often novel approach to problems and challenges that are driven by need rather than mere market forces. In general, we know little about how diverse actors interact to enact pro-poor and social innovations aimed at addressing societal challenges in emerging economies. The majority of social innovations in emerging economies are driven by necessity and take place at the grassroots level, involving mechanisms of empowerment and changes in established patterns of action as well as in structures of social relations. One important aspect that has been instrumental for the fostering of a socially inclusive culture of innovation in emerging country contexts is undoubtedly the rise of social entrepreneurship, which in part is attributable to the governments‘ limitations in delivering social change.
The session will provide a space for discussion on different aspects how social innovations can be enacted. Three different papers on different cases and country contexts (India, Ghana) will be presented and discussed. The presentation and discussion of the papers will be followed by a panel discussion with representatives from academic and social-profit backgrounds, that will frame the cases presented in a broader context.

TALKS:

Dr. Mary Lourthu (India), Stella Maris College
Social innovation for Inclusion

Dr. Hubby Mathew (India), Peermade Development Society
Reviving agriculture through organic farming among marginal farmers and tribal communities. Success story from Peermade Development Society, Kerala, India

Martin Adokiya, PhD (Ghana), University for Development Studies, Tamale
Dietary diversity and other underlying predictors of anemia status among pregnant women in Northern Ghana

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Panel 2c

Brain circulation


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Heinz Theisen

CONTENT:

In the knowledge-based world economy, brain circulation will be critical to construction and prosperity. However, only 20-50% of students worldwide return home. China, on the other hand, has succeeded in transforming brain drain into brain circulation. The majority of their students are now returning to China. In the case of refugees and migrants, however, the permanent loss of young people for the sending countries is to be feared.
In his article on "Contemporary emigration of highly educated Croats to Germany", Tado Juric from the Catholic University of Croatia will examine the causes of brain drain using Croatia as an example. Accordingly, most well-educated Croats leave their homeland not for financial gain, but out of frustration at the lack of development and moral disruption in their country. The push factors are far stronger than the pull factors. This is likely to apply to most migrant countries and threatens to end in a vicious circle for poorly developed countries.
Heinz Theisen addresses the political dimension of education and science. Does China gain unfair competitive advantages by adopting educational and research results? Will knowledge even become a weapon in the competition between powers? In contrast, how can the universality of education and science be preserved? How can brain circulation be used for coexistence and cooperation between cultures and powers?
Siyka Chavdarova-Kostova from the University of Sofia focuses on the role of social workers in migration and flight. The training for refugee work at the University of Sofia deals with topics such as diversity, integration, inclusion, traditional minorities and causes of flight. The focus is on the following questions: How can skills for communication and active interaction with refugees be trained? How can the goals of sensitisation and professionalisation in working with refugees be achieved?

TALKS:

Tado Juric, PhD (Croatia), Catholic University of Croatia
Contemporary emigration of highly educated Croats to Germany

Prof. Dr. Heinz Theisen (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
Brain Circulation between cultures and civilizations

Prof. Dr. Siyka Chavdarova-Kostova (Bulgaria), Sofia University "St. Kliment Ohridski"
Master program ''Social work with refugees and migrants'' – an innovation in higher education in Bulgaria

Prof. Nyirindejwe Munyambaraga Innocent (Democratic Republic of Congo), The Catholic La Sapientia College Goma
Brain circulation: challenges and opportunities or the lesser of two evils – the tasks ofinstitutions of higher learning

Sheik Dr. Taher Amini Golestani (Iran), University Ghom
Oriental integration in occidental lands, an example of Glocalisation

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Panel 2d

Digital transformation


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Michael Ziemons

CONTENT:

Digitalisation will never replace the personal services of social work, health sciences and practical theology in the same way as in other occupations, but it can have an important supporting function. How can universities tackle the challenges and opportunities of digitalisation in the various fields of work without neglecting their specific perspective?

TALKS:

Prof. Dr. Michael Ziemons (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
Communication affects and digital consulting

Prof. Dr. Tobias Hölterhof (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
Open educational resources in higher education

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Panel 2e

Local communities


CHAIR:

Prof. Dr. Werner Schönig

CONTENT:

Local communities face global challenges and they are key in handling those issues. The panel includes three contributions, which focus on community work, universities, and urban segregation.

TALKS:

Prof. Dr. Werner Schönig (Germany), Catholic University of Applied Sciences NRW
Ethic and religious segregation within cities

Sandra Ayala (Ecuador), Pontifical Catholic University of Ecuador Ibarra
Comparative study of the students and teachers perceptions of the evaluation applied in the university

Jaroslova Stastna, PhD (Czech Republic), Charles University
Revisited concept of community work

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